All Noise Control Baffles Installation Instructions

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Soundproofing and Noise Control Frequently Asked Questions

We have listed below some of the most common questions and their answers in hopes of providing basic knowledge related to noise, and noise control products and systems.

What is Noise?
Noise is defined as unwanted sound. Unwanted sound can be hazardous to your hearing or can be simply disturbing, interfering or annoying. Sound does not have to be loud to be unwanted.

What level does noise become harmful to me?
Driven by OSHA standards, corporate safety departments and insurance carriers, noise levels are typically set 85 dB-A as the high noise level. Individuals exposed to this noise are permitted to work an 8 hour shift with hearing protection. Administrative and engineered controls should be taken to reduce the employees noise exposure at 85 dB-A.

What is dB-A?
The sound pressure level designed to closely reflect the response of the human ear. We are less sensitive to low and high frequencies, thus an “A” weighted noise level is what we hear.

What does 85 dB-A sound like?
Buses, motorcycles, and pneumatic tools at 50 feet. You must raise you voice to a near shout to speak over 85 dB-A.

What is N.R.C.?
The Noise Reduction Coefficient of a product is the average absorption across four octave band center frequencies. (250 Hz., 500 Hz., 1000 Hz., 2000 Hz.) You can roughly estimate that a product with an NRC .75 will absorb 75% of the sound energy that hits it. The highest level is NRC 1.0.

What is STC?
A single number decibel rating of the transmission loss properties of a product. Doors, windows, walls, floors, etc. are tested to determine how much noise passes through. The testing determines a product’s STC. The higher the number the better.

How do we prevent equipment from overheating in a noise enclosure?
Silenced ventilation systems can be as simple as a blower system that moves existing plant air through the enclosure or as complex as separate HVAC systems. Silencers on the intake and exhaust will prevent the passage of noise in or out of the enclosure.

How do we maintain access to the equipment for maintenance?
Maintenance access is a key consideration in the design of an enclosure. Lengthy discussions with the equipment operators and maintenance personnel will ensure proper access is provided to all required areas. Swing, sliding, and removable doors and plugs are how most access is obtained.

Why is the machinery louder in my shop than what the manufacturer’s data shows?
Most equipment is tested in a free field condition, a room with no hard surfaces that reflect sound. Most industrial facilities have hard floor, hard walls, and hard ceilings. The reflected sound can build up to create a higher noise level. When the equipment is placed near other machinery making noise you can build noise as well. Isolating each piece of equipment can dramatically reduce the noise levels.

Why do I care about noise at my property line?
Noise is measured at your lot line. The neighbor’s home may be 400 feet from the lot line but codes state that you cannot send noise off your property. Communities may or may not have a noise ordinance for you to follow. If they do not have an existing ordinance you can be assured they will write one directed at you.

ACOUSTICALLY ENHANCED SOUNDBREAK GYPSUM BOARD INSTALLATION

SoundBreak Gypsum Board – ½” Thick

ACOUSTICALLY ENHANCED SOUNDBREAK GYPSUM BOARD INSTALLATION

A.    General: Install in accordance with manufacturer recommendations and GA-214.

B.    Single Layer – 2×4 wood stud construction (non-rated, STC 53)

1.    Apply one layer of acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to each side of wood studs, using 1-1/4 inch Type W screws, 12 inches on center.

2.    Provide 1/4 inch gap between acoustically enhanced gypsum board perimeter edge and dissimilar materials.

         3.    Seal perimeter gap [and penetrations] with acoustical sealant.

C.    Single Layer – 2×4 wood stud construction (1 hour-rated, Load Bearing; STC 53)

1.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to each side of wood studs, using 1-¼ inch Type W screws, 12 inches on center.

          2.    Apply paper tape and joint compound at all joints.

3.    Cover all screw heads with compound.

D.    Unbalanced Staggered – 2×4 wood stud construction (1 hour-rated; STC 60)

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to one side of staggered 2 x 4 wood studs, on 2×6 plates using 1-1/4 inch type W screws, 12 inches   on center.

          2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board using 2 inch type W

     Screws, 16 inches on center. Stagger vertical joints 16 inches on center each layer.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of wood studs using 1-1/4 inch type W screws 12 inches on center. Stagger vertical joints

16 inches.

E.    H-Stud Area Separation Wall – wood stud construction (2 hour-rated; STC 67)

1.    Insert two layers of 1 inch fire resistant rated shaft liner into 2 inch H-studs spaced 24 inches on center.

          2.    Provide a minimum ¾ inch air space between shaft liner and adjacent construction.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch of acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to each outside face of wood studs, using 1-¼ inch Type W screws, 12 inches on center.

F.    Single Layer – 3-5/8 inch metal stud construction (1 hour-rated, Nonbearing; STC 54)

1.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs using 1-inch Type S screws, 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field.

2.    Apply one layer 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of metal studs using 1 inch type S screws 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field. Stagger joints on opposite side of wall assembly.

          3.    Apply paper tape and joint compound at all tapered joints.

          4.    Cover all screw heads with compound.

G.    Unbalanced – 3-5/8 inch metal stud construction (1-hour-rated, Nonbearing; STC 57)

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs using 1-inch type S screws, 24 inches on center.

          2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically using 1-5/8 inch

Type S screws, 12 inches on center.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of metal studs using 1-inch Type S screws, 12 inches on center.

          4.    Stagger all vertical joints 24 inches.

          5.    Apply paper tape and joint compound at all tapered joints.

          6.    Cover all screw heads with compound.

H.    Double Layer – [3-5/8 inch metal stud construction (1 hour-rated; STC 60)] OR [6 inch metal stud construction (1 hour-rated; STC 61)]

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs using 1-inch Type S screws, 24 inches on center.

2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically using 1-5/8 inch type S screws, 12 inches on center.

3.    Apply two layers of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side, using 1-inch type S screws, 24 inches on center for base layer and 1-5/8 inch type S screws, 12 inches on center for face layer.

          4.    Stagger all vertical joints 24 inches.

I.    [Unbalanced Layer – 2-1/2 inch double metal stud construction (1 hour-rated, Nonbearing; STC59)

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs, using 1-inch Type S screws, 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field.

          2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically using 1-5/8 inch

Type S screws, 12 inches on center, offset 8 inches from first layer.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of metal studs, using 1-inch Type S screws, 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field.

         4.    Stagger vertical joints on opposite sides.

                     5.     Cover all screw heads with compound.

Soundproofing Door – Sound Retardant Doors – Installation Instructions

Soundproofing Door – Sound Retardant Doors

Sound control can be an important element in some buildings or certain rooms within a building. To meet sound transmission specifications, All Noise Control Door Systems offers a wide range of acoustic doors. Our Acoustic Doors provide many options to choose from including:

    • Sound Transmission Class (STC) ratings from 21db through 47db.
    • All doors are 1-3/4″ thick.
    • Complete factory machining is available to meet your hardware requirements.
    • Factory finishing with All Noise Control Door Systems’ Enviroclad UV® 17 Designer colors, custom color stain matching, primed or opaque matching available.
    • All fire rated doors are available with ITS-WH or UL neutral pressure labels or UL positive pressure labels.
    • Add the dimension of lite to your door using factory glazing with our Expressions del Sol® glass collection.

      For more information about our expanding acoustic door offering, please contact All Noise control.


      Sound control can be an important element in some buildings or certain rooms within a building. To meet sound transmission specifications, All Noise Control Signature Series offers a wide range of acoustic doors that feature both maximum sound reduction efficiency and the attractiveness of wood face veneer or decorative laminate.

      They are recommended for use in all institutional and architectural applications where sound control is of utmost importance.

      Installation Requirements – To meet part 1 of UBC 7-2 (97):

      Category “A” Doors – No additional edge sealing system required to meet part 1 of UBC 7-2 (97).

      • This category includes 45, 60 & 90-minute doors that have a 1/16″ – 1/8″ single ply of intumescent material that is located approximately 1/4″ from each of the finished stile edges. No additional intumescent is required.

        Installation Requirements: Single Door – To meet part 2 of UBC 7-2 (97):

      • All door applications (Category “A” Doors): Install “Listed” smoke seal gasketing on both door jambs and header (see drawings J and K). For door and transom assemblies with a transom bar, also install the “Listed” smoke seal gasketing on all edges of the frame around the transom.

        Installation Requirements: Pairs and Door and Transom Doors – To meet part 1 & 2 of UBC 7-2 (97):

      • Pair with metal edge and astragal set: Install the metal edge and astragal on the doors. A Category “A” Door will not require any additional intumescent or smoke seal gasketing at the meeting edges (see drawing L).
      • Pair without metal edges: The meeting edge intumescent is installed under Label Service. Apply a strip of “Listed” smoke seal gasketing on one leaf of the pair at the meeting edge (see drawing M).

        Door and transom assemblies without a transom bar: The meeting rail intumescent is installed under Label Service. Where meeting rail intumescent includes a smoke seal, no additional smoke seal gasketing is required at the meeting rails (see drawing P). Where meeting rail intumescent does not include a smoke seal, additional “Listed” smoke seal gasketing is also required at the meeting rails (see drawing Q)



        Drawings show example placements of gasketing and sealing systems

         

Acoustics is the study of sound and how it behaves in various environments.

Acoustics is the study of sound and how it behaves in various environments. Sound effects such as absorption, reflection, refraction or interference are also studied by acoustics. The broad acceptance of the term ‘acoustics’ refers to all the aspects of sound. Until not long ago, the notions ‘acoustics’ and ‘sound’ referred to waves and elastic vibrations that humans could hear. However, in the twentieth century, the development of technology and science has led to the broadening of the field of acoustics, in that it now comprises aspects not directly related to the hearing process, such as intensities and frequencies which are above or below the audible limits of humans.

When speaking of sounds, most people think of the vibrations in any type of medium, which can cause the sensation of hearing. Any unwanted sound is perceived as a noise. The term is definitely subjective, since what is music for one person can very well be noise for another. When such unwanted sounds are excessive, their effects can be destructive, which is now known by the name of noise pollution. Adverse noise effects fall into three categories, physiological, psychological and communicational. Unfortunately, there aren’t any known and adopted remedies for the last two categories. Noise pollution is a complex problem and surveys show a disturbing fact, that noise levels are continually rising in cities.

As far as the sounds inside buildings go, we can speak about two main ways of transmission. Firstly, the sound emanated from either human activity or mechanical noise inside the building travels airborne through walls, ceiling or floor. Sounds from human activity include loud voice or amplified systems. Mechanical noise refers to the sounds produced by elevators, generators, air conditioning systems and so on. Secondly, interior sound can be transmitted not through air, but through the building itself. The former is easier to abate than the latter through wall or ceiling assemblies which meet certain established performance standards.

Statistics say that millions of employees are exposed to noise in the office, and therefore are subjected to all the risks that come along. Work-related stress and accidents which occur because of masked warning signals are just two of them, not to mention the lack of productivity and efficiency on the part of the office workers. Noise represents a safety issue, but also a productivity issue for the employees. The office should be a quiet place to work and an office with good acoustics will provide the employees with the ability to concentrate and not be distracted. Reducing the intensity of sounds is called soundproofing.

Soundproofing can be accomplished in a variety of ways. The distance between the source and the receiver could be increased, sound wave energy could be blocked or absorbed by means of noise barriers, sound baffles could be used as damping structures, or anti-noise generators could be activated. With soundproofing, noise can be affected in two ways: it can be either reduced or absorbed. Noise reduction implies blocking the sound wave passage with intervening objects. The absorption of noise refers to echoes and reverberation being suppressed.

The office environment is a place for many acoustic challenges. If sound levels in the office affect efficiency and productivity, the good news is that there are solutions for office noise control. There are many soundproofing materials which improve the sound quality within the room and eliminate the transfer of sound from one room to another. Office noise control is a must for quiet environments in which employees can concentrate and be efficient in their work. Soundproofing materials play an important part in office noise control, since other methods have failed to show efficiency. Not only are soundproofing materials a useful barrier in blocking noise, but they are also excellent in appearance. Soundproofing materials add an aesthetic touch to your place of work, not to mention that they are fire rated.

For more related subjects about Soundproofing or for more resources regarding Office Noise Control please review www.allnoisecontrol.com.

Acoustics is the study of sound and how it behaves in various environments.

Acoustics is the study of sound and how it behaves in various environments. Sound effects such as absorption, reflection, refraction or interference are also studied by acoustics. The broad acceptance of the term ‘acoustics’ refers to all the aspects of sound. Until not long ago, the notions ‘acoustics’ and ‘sound’ referred to waves and elastic vibrations that humans could hear. However, in the twentieth century, the development of technology and science has led to the broadening of the field of acoustics, in that it now comprises aspects not directly related to the hearing process, such as intensities and frequencies which are above or below the audible limits of humans.

When speaking of sounds, most people think of the vibrations in any type of medium, which can cause the sensation of hearing. Any unwanted sound is perceived as a noise. The term is definitely subjective, since what is music for one person can very well be noise for another. When such unwanted sounds are excessive, their effects can be destructive, which is now known by the name of noise pollution. Adverse noise effects fall into three categories, physiological, psychological and communicational. Unfortunately, there aren’t any known and adopted remedies for the last two categories. Noise pollution is a complex problem and surveys show a disturbing fact, that noise levels are continually rising in cities.

As far as the sounds inside buildings go, we can speak about two main ways of transmission. Firstly, the sound emanated from either human activity or mechanical noise inside the building travels airborne through walls, ceiling or floor. Sounds from human activity include loud voice or amplified systems. Mechanical noise refers to the sounds produced by elevators, generators, air conditioning systems and so on. Secondly, interior sound can be transmitted not through air, but through the building itself. The former is easier to abate than the latter through wall or ceiling assemblies which meet certain established performance standards.

Statistics say that millions of employees are exposed to noise in the office, and therefore are subjected to all the risks that come along. Work-related stress and accidents which occur because of masked warning signals are just two of them, not to mention the lack of productivity and efficiency on the part of the office workers. Noise represents a safety issue, but also a productivity issue for the employees. The office should be a quiet place to work and an office with good acoustics will provide the employees with the ability to concentrate and not be distracted. Reducing the intensity of sounds is called soundproofing.

Soundproofing can be accomplished in a variety of ways. The distance between the source and the receiver could be increased, sound wave energy could be blocked or absorbed by means of noise barriers, sound baffles could be used as damping structures, or anti-noise generators could be activated. With soundproofing, noise can be affected in two ways: it can be either reduced or absorbed. Noise reduction implies blocking the sound wave passage with intervening objects. The absorption of noise refers to echoes and reverberation being suppressed.

The office environment is a place for many acoustic challenges. If sound levels in the office affect efficiency and productivity, the good news is that there are solutions for office noise control. There are many soundproofing materials which improve the sound quality within the room and eliminate the transfer of sound from one room to another. Office noise control is a must for quiet environments in which employees can concentrate and be efficient in their work. Soundproofing materials play an important part in office noise control, since other methods have failed to show efficiency. Not only are soundproofing materials a useful barrier in blocking noise, but they are also excellent in appearance. Soundproofing materials add an aesthetic touch to your place of work, not to mention that they are fire rated.

For more related subjects about Soundproofing or for more resources regarding Office Noise Control please review www.allnoisecontrol.com.