ANC Soundproofing Case Study – Corolla Cantena Effectively Resolves Their Soundproofing Control Issue…….

The Corolla Cantena Effectively Resolves Their Soundproofing Control Issue with Soundproofing Milti Purpose Baffles….

THE PROBLEM:

Certain areas of the Catena, were emitting too much noise.

THE SOLUTION:

All Noise Control suggested that they use our superior Multi-Purpose Baffles – Installation of PVC covered sound baffles to reduce reverberation time on Walls.

ANC-600 BAFFLE:

  • ACOUSTICAL CEILING BAFFLES
  • FINISH: PVC FILM
  • COLORS: BLACK
  • THICKNESS: 1.5″
  • DENSITY: 1.6#
  • EDGE DETAIL: NATURAL
  • CONSTRUCTION: SEWN
  • SUSPENSION: GROMMETS

THE RESULTS:

With the soundproofing materials provided, All Noise Control managed to completely reduce the sound. This made the environment more productive, and cost-effective.

We invite you to call All Noise Control at 561-964-9360 to discuss the noise control materials supplied to this particular environment and are just as happy to listen to your individual needs and supply you with a customized All Noise control solution. You may also visit our page for more information at www.allnoisecontrol.com .

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The Leighton McGin Effectively Resolves Their Noise Control Issue….

Soundproofing Case Study


THE PROBLEM:

Even the biggest noise problems, can be treated with just a simple solution. Leighton McGin Company had similar problems. Noise was traveling through one door way.

THE SOLUTION:

Upon contacting All Noise Control we showed them the options and acoustic properties of our ANC-AB2DC – Quilted Fiberglass Door Panel. Their custom sizes with hinges and variations of door handle and key holes were a simple, cost effective solution. Our ANC-AB2DC blanket was trimmed and finished to their doors measurements and was installed quickly.

THE RESULTS:

Immediately the noise was quieted and a healthy, productive level of quiet spread through the facility. Our quilted fiberglass door blankets steadily achieve STC ratings of 29 and coupled with other noise absorption and barrier products can control even the loudest of noises.

We invite you to call All Noise Control at 561-964-9360 to discuss the noise control materials supplied to this particular environment and are just as happy to listen to your individual needs and supply you with a customized All Noise control solution. You may also visit our page for more information at www.allnoisecontrol.com .



HHI Corporation Effectively Resolves Their Noise Vibration Issue….

Soundproofing Case Study


The problem:

HHI Corporation contacted All Noise Control; they needed a resolution to a noise pollution that would prevent echoing within the room, also to prevent vibration noise troubles in large place as well with noise going out. The main objective of the project was to avert the echoing, and to prevent sound exposure noises within the project.

The Solution:

All Noise Control recommended the Acoustical Ceiling Baffles. This would eliminate built up sound due to noise reflection, in other words the echoing, and sound exposure. With the Acoustical Ceiling Baffle the noise would be dramatically reduce. This Acoustical Ceiling Baffle it is ideal for these applications.

The Acoustical Ceiling Baffle (ANC-600) it requires baffles that have a “crisp” corner and a finished face. This makes our ANC-600 ceiling baffles have an aesthetic finished look as well as superior noise control and sound absorption properties. The ANC-600 ceiling baffle is 1 ½ ” thick in standard 2’x4′ sizes. They are available up to 4′ x 8′ for larger applications.

HHI Corporation is very pleased with the results! They goal has been achieved, the vibrations, the echoing, and the sound exposure has been prevented.

We invite you to call All Noise Control at 561-964-9360 to discuss the noise control materials to this particular corporate environment and are just as happy to listen to your individual needs and supply you with customized all noise control solution. You may also visit our Acoustical Ceiling Baffle (ANC-600) page for more information at www.allnoisecontrol.com

Soundproofing and Noise Control Frequently Asked Questions

We have listed below some of the most common questions and their answers in hopes of providing basic knowledge related to noise, and noise control products and systems.

What is Noise?
Noise is defined as unwanted sound. Unwanted sound can be hazardous to your hearing or can be simply disturbing, interfering or annoying. Sound does not have to be loud to be unwanted.

What level does noise become harmful to me?
Driven by OSHA standards, corporate safety departments and insurance carriers, noise levels are typically set 85 dB-A as the high noise level. Individuals exposed to this noise are permitted to work an 8 hour shift with hearing protection. Administrative and engineered controls should be taken to reduce the employees noise exposure at 85 dB-A.

What is dB-A?
The sound pressure level designed to closely reflect the response of the human ear. We are less sensitive to low and high frequencies, thus an “A” weighted noise level is what we hear.

What does 85 dB-A sound like?
Buses, motorcycles, and pneumatic tools at 50 feet. You must raise you voice to a near shout to speak over 85 dB-A.

What is N.R.C.?
The Noise Reduction Coefficient of a product is the average absorption across four octave band center frequencies. (250 Hz., 500 Hz., 1000 Hz., 2000 Hz.) You can roughly estimate that a product with an NRC .75 will absorb 75% of the sound energy that hits it. The highest level is NRC 1.0.

What is STC?
A single number decibel rating of the transmission loss properties of a product. Doors, windows, walls, floors, etc. are tested to determine how much noise passes through. The testing determines a product’s STC. The higher the number the better.

How do we prevent equipment from overheating in a noise enclosure?
Silenced ventilation systems can be as simple as a blower system that moves existing plant air through the enclosure or as complex as separate HVAC systems. Silencers on the intake and exhaust will prevent the passage of noise in or out of the enclosure.

How do we maintain access to the equipment for maintenance?
Maintenance access is a key consideration in the design of an enclosure. Lengthy discussions with the equipment operators and maintenance personnel will ensure proper access is provided to all required areas. Swing, sliding, and removable doors and plugs are how most access is obtained.

Why is the machinery louder in my shop than what the manufacturer’s data shows?
Most equipment is tested in a free field condition, a room with no hard surfaces that reflect sound. Most industrial facilities have hard floor, hard walls, and hard ceilings. The reflected sound can build up to create a higher noise level. When the equipment is placed near other machinery making noise you can build noise as well. Isolating each piece of equipment can dramatically reduce the noise levels.

Why do I care about noise at my property line?
Noise is measured at your lot line. The neighbor’s home may be 400 feet from the lot line but codes state that you cannot send noise off your property. Communities may or may not have a noise ordinance for you to follow. If they do not have an existing ordinance you can be assured they will write one directed at you.

ACOUSTICALLY ENHANCED SOUNDBREAK GYPSUM BOARD INSTALLATION

SoundBreak Gypsum Board – ½” Thick

ACOUSTICALLY ENHANCED SOUNDBREAK GYPSUM BOARD INSTALLATION

A.    General: Install in accordance with manufacturer recommendations and GA-214.

B.    Single Layer – 2×4 wood stud construction (non-rated, STC 53)

1.    Apply one layer of acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to each side of wood studs, using 1-1/4 inch Type W screws, 12 inches on center.

2.    Provide 1/4 inch gap between acoustically enhanced gypsum board perimeter edge and dissimilar materials.

         3.    Seal perimeter gap [and penetrations] with acoustical sealant.

C.    Single Layer – 2×4 wood stud construction (1 hour-rated, Load Bearing; STC 53)

1.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to each side of wood studs, using 1-¼ inch Type W screws, 12 inches on center.

          2.    Apply paper tape and joint compound at all joints.

3.    Cover all screw heads with compound.

D.    Unbalanced Staggered – 2×4 wood stud construction (1 hour-rated; STC 60)

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to one side of staggered 2 x 4 wood studs, on 2×6 plates using 1-1/4 inch type W screws, 12 inches   on center.

          2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board using 2 inch type W

     Screws, 16 inches on center. Stagger vertical joints 16 inches on center each layer.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of wood studs using 1-1/4 inch type W screws 12 inches on center. Stagger vertical joints

16 inches.

E.    H-Stud Area Separation Wall – wood stud construction (2 hour-rated; STC 67)

1.    Insert two layers of 1 inch fire resistant rated shaft liner into 2 inch H-studs spaced 24 inches on center.

          2.    Provide a minimum ¾ inch air space between shaft liner and adjacent construction.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch of acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to each outside face of wood studs, using 1-¼ inch Type W screws, 12 inches on center.

F.    Single Layer – 3-5/8 inch metal stud construction (1 hour-rated, Nonbearing; STC 54)

1.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs using 1-inch Type S screws, 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field.

2.    Apply one layer 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of metal studs using 1 inch type S screws 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field. Stagger joints on opposite side of wall assembly.

          3.    Apply paper tape and joint compound at all tapered joints.

          4.    Cover all screw heads with compound.

G.    Unbalanced – 3-5/8 inch metal stud construction (1-hour-rated, Nonbearing; STC 57)

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs using 1-inch type S screws, 24 inches on center.

          2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically using 1-5/8 inch

Type S screws, 12 inches on center.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of metal studs using 1-inch Type S screws, 12 inches on center.

          4.    Stagger all vertical joints 24 inches.

          5.    Apply paper tape and joint compound at all tapered joints.

          6.    Cover all screw heads with compound.

H.    Double Layer – [3-5/8 inch metal stud construction (1 hour-rated; STC 60)] OR [6 inch metal stud construction (1 hour-rated; STC 61)]

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs using 1-inch Type S screws, 24 inches on center.

2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically using 1-5/8 inch type S screws, 12 inches on center.

3.    Apply two layers of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side, using 1-inch type S screws, 24 inches on center for base layer and 1-5/8 inch type S screws, 12 inches on center for face layer.

          4.    Stagger all vertical joints 24 inches.

I.    [Unbalanced Layer – 2-1/2 inch double metal stud construction (1 hour-rated, Nonbearing; STC59)

1.    Apply base layer of 5/8 inch acoustically enhanced gypsum board vertically to one side of metal studs, using 1-inch Type S screws, 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field.

          2.    Apply face layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically using 1-5/8 inch

Type S screws, 12 inches on center, offset 8 inches from first layer.

3.    Apply one layer of 5/8 inch fire resistant rated gypsum board vertically to opposite side of metal studs, using 1-inch Type S screws, 8 inches on center at perimeter and 12 inches on center in the field.

         4.    Stagger vertical joints on opposite sides.

                     5.     Cover all screw heads with compound.

Sound Insulation

Sound insulation is the process of soundproofing an enclosed space, such as a room. This type of insulating activity is usually employed when there is a need to keep sound from filtering into or out of the space. Sound insulation techniques are often used in business settings, as well as in multi-family dwellings like duplexes and apartment buildings.

In order to prevent background noise from interfering with the recording process, singers and musicians create their vocal and instrumental tracks in a soundproof recording booth. Because the booth prohibits the introduction of sounds from outside the space, there is nothing present to distort or interfere with the quality of the recording. The audio tracks containing vocal performances and the various music tracks are captured exactly as the performers hear them.

In living space, sound insulation normally involves the installation of insulation in walls, under floors and above ceilings. This can be especially important in apartment buildings and other structures where people live in close proximity. The inclusion of the insulation between apartments to the side, above, and below helps to ensure all the residents enjoy a measure of peace and quiet, even when others in the building are playing music or having a party.

In an office setting, it is not unusual for the individual offices of managers to be insulated for privacy. This makes it less likely for confidential discussions between an employee and a manager to be overheard by others working elsewhere on the floor or near the door of the manager’s office. In like manner, conference rooms are often treated to a sound insulation treatment; ensuring discussions taking place within that space are not overheard by others in the immediate vicinity.

Soundproofing insulation is a man-made material that is designed to absorb sound waves. This type of insulation is commonly installed in recording studios, meeting rooms and concert halls. The purpose of soundproofing insulation is to improve the enjoyment of the sound in the initial room through the removal of external noises, and to eliminate the traveling of the sound waves outside the room.

Soundproofing foam is a building material used to control the transmission and absorption of sound. This material can be used to achieve two distinct goals when it comes to sound control. First, it is used in homes and commercial buildings to block sound from the outdoors, keeping the interior of the space quieter for the occupants. Soundproofing foam can also be used to absorb noises in recording studios or theaters, which reduces echo and improves the quality of the sounds.

To understand how different types of soundproofing foam can be used, one must first understand how sound waves and noise levels are measured. The ability of an object to block sound is measured by its Sound Transmission Coefficient (STC) rating, which can range from 0 to 100. A wall with a STC rating of 50, for example, means that noise levels on one side of the wall are 50 decibels higher than on the other side. Sound absorption is measured using the Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC), which generally falls between 0 and 1. This number shows the amount of sound absorbed by an object, and the higher the NRC value, the more noise is absorbed.

A soundproof ceiling is a ceiling that has been designed to cut down on the noise that is transferred from overhead to the area below. A soundproof ceiling is a nice addition for people who live in apartments, but, surprisingly, many people who live in private homes are also interested in soundproofing their ceilings.

A soundproof door is a door which has been designed or retrofitted to cut out as much external noise as possible. However, a soundproof door is also very dependent on a well-designed frame, or sound can leak around the edges of the frame. Unwanted noise can also filter through walls and windows, which are an important consideration for people who are attempting to soundproof a room or building.

There are a variety of situations in which a soundproof door can be useful. Musicians and recording studios rely on such doors to keep sounds from getting out, both for the comfort of the neighbors and for the benefit of other musicians and recording facilities which could be compromised by sound leakage. Soundproof doors are also used to seal noisy rooms like boiler rooms and entrances to factory floors. People can also utilize soundproof doors to keep unwanted sound out of their homes.